Linked: The case for turning off your Zoom camera
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Linked: The case for turning off your Zoom camera

Stop considering people who aren’t on camera as less engaged. This is just your bias. Your smartest employees understand the additional stress being on camera causes and take every opportunity to limit that effect for themselves. Keep people who are that self-aware.

Recently, I was doing a training session with some new employees and started off by telling them to turn their cameras off. I am fairly sure it was their favorite meeting of their week.

Think about how easy that was. I was showing them how to use a cloud tool, I wanted them focused on the screen, what I was doing and what I was saying about what I was doing. They were. I didn’t need their cameras to tell me that.

Linked: 5 Simple Ways to Do More for Your Employees’ Mental Health This Week
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Linked: 5 Simple Ways to Do More for Your Employees’ Mental Health This Week

The reason I wanted to focus on this is that it can also be very easy to underestimate how much time people are spending on their work when the work is being done remotely, or in a hybrid situation. Even in the legal or consulting worlds where many of us are billing our time, or at least tracking time worked on projects, it’s not telling you the whole story. There is a lot of time spent on miscellaneous tasks that are getting lost in whatever tool you’re using to track the amount of time worked.

It’s the 15 minutes I logged in to check my schedule before accepting a handful of meeting requests before heading to bed. The time spent clearing out the inbox over my first cup of coffee, or answering questions for a newer coworker, it’s all very likely to not show up in the “official” time because it happens, and then we forget about it.

Do you know how much time your people work without considering it time worth tracking? Do you know how much those little interruptions add to the overall stress levels?

Shared Links (weekly) May 29, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) May 29, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) April 27, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) April 27, 2022

Linked: Some workers can’t afford to RTO
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Linked: Some workers can’t afford to RTO

As someone who has worked remotely since mid-2019, I have appreciated the number of ways my life is less expensive for a while.

That was before the recent bout of inflation, though. How much more am I saving by driving infrequently, not paying for parking or public transit, not needing to buy new business clothes, and eating the food I have in my house for lunch every day?

This was not insignificant in 2019 when I made the change. In 2022 that has to be much more than it was.

So, when you’re contemplating your return to the office strategy, are you calculating the pay cut you’re forcing on all of your employees, and how many of them can’t actually afford that?