Shared Links (weekly) Nov. 22, 2020

posted in: Weekly Links 0 |
Reading Time: 1 minute

Metadata Vanishes

– Craig with a good explanation of why sending your photo evidence as inline images in an email is not ideal..

6 skills employees will need in the post-pandemic workplace

Employee Burnout: How Leaders Can Help Right Now

5 Remote Work Practices for Better Work-Life Balance

27% of Ransomware Victims Pay the Ransom

The Power of Proactive E-Discovery

TAR 1.0 vs TAR 2.0: Is the Newer Version the Better Version?

Five Reasons Why Organizations May Be (Or Should Be) Bringing More Discovery In-House

2020 “Work-Life Balance”? Survival Guide

Microsoft: Stop Using Phone-Based Multifactor-Authentication!

Age Discrimination Will Be More Widespread: Here’s What to Do

Five Great Reads on eDiscovery for November 2020… Read More

Linked: Covid-19 Explodes the Myth That Women ‘Opt’ Out of the Workforce

posted in: Career, Links 0 |
Reading Time: 4 minutes

I’m a man with no children. So, working extra hours when the need arises isn’t really an issue. (It’s a mental health and work/life balance issue when it never ends, but when that happens I can choose to go do something else, and we’ve made some progress in recognizing this in many workplaces.) On the other hand, I know, pretty instinctively, that if I put a hard 40 hour limit, or a hard ending of my day at a certain time, no matter what, I’d probably be out of a job. Yet, for people with children, there needs to be a hard cap on the hours spent working. The pandemic creating this home/virtual school issue made this worse, and more obvious, but it’s always been an issue. Lots of workplaces talk a good game about balance and flexibility, but when push comes to shove, most of them will also demand that you figure out your childcare issues on your own time and be available to work in a pinch. So, you login from home all evening and work, and if you’re a single parent, the kids get ignored, or maybe you can find someone else to watch them for you. If there are two parents, you’d better hope you both don’t have those kinds of jobs, because one of you needs to be available for childcare, you can’t both be online working all night. 

And, if you have to choose which one leaves that kind of work arrangement, well, in general, women get paid less and have less advancement opportunities, (partially because they are more likely to “opt-out”), so they are going to be the ones to opt out, perpetuating the impression that women make these choices, that are then used to justify not changing the workplace to accommodate working mothers. After all, they’re likely to leave anyway, right? 

It’s really quite the little, vicious, circle we’ve made for women in the workplace. … Read More

Linked: Where Did Our Lunch Breaks Go?

posted in: Career, Links 0 |
Reading Time: 2 minutes

My point in describing these things is not to brag about how much work I do, or how many teams I interact with, but to point out that it’s easy to find your time and energy completely blocked and scheduled for you. Fighting burn out means protecting, and sometimes fighting for, your free time, including a lunch break.

Employers who are interested in not burning out their employees would do well to recognize that as well. As the article below points out, remote working gives us all a lot more flexibility to take breaks, and then do some of our work on our own schedule, since we no longer have to commute, or be in a location, but that doesn’t mean you work all day, and then also into the night.

Breaks matter. Balance matters. Remote work is a great way to find your own level of flexibility, and to provide it to your employees. I suggest you figure that out.… Read More

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