Linked – Can remote work cause depression?

Linked – Can remote work cause depression?

Working from home opens up opportunities to people who can’t, for many reasons, travel to an office every day. It can, however, be lonely at times. Finding the right balance is key. Finding the places where you can still connect with people outside of work is key. You’re no longer spending a third of your day in the same location as your coworkers and connecting by default. Still, you can connect and be more involved in your community because you’re not spending another couple of hours commuting. You can spend more time with your family.

You have to figure out what works and doesn’t work.

It’s a Global Economy and a Global Talent Pool For Many Remote Workplaces

It’s a Global Economy and a Global Talent Pool For Many Remote Workplaces

I find it interesting that the same people who only want to hire “the most qualified” person also want to limit themselves to hiring only people who live in the vicinity of their office and are physically able to be in the office 8-10 hours per day, five days a week. It seems that leaves out many talented people who might be better qualified. Can your company compete with just that labor pool in a global economy when others search the world for talent?

If foreign companies poach American workers to work remotely, they might know something you don’t.

It’s Almost As If Remote Work Keeps Getting Better While Office Work Keeps Getting Worse

It’s Almost As If Remote Work Keeps Getting Better While Office Work Keeps Getting Worse

Now, I’m not going to even argue that remote work is better and helps people be more productive and innovative because you already know where I stand on that issue. Let me just throw this out there instead. When your workforce is remote you widen the pool of people who can work for you and want to work for you. That wider candidate pool invites more talented people to come work for you and talented people will find their own ways to be productive and innovative.