Linked: The death of ‘mandatory fun’ in the office

Linked: The death of ‘mandatory fun’ in the office

This has always been the key, but I suspect too many employees lacked the power to say it. Some of my best friends are people I met at work. I met my wife at work. Clearly, I am not against interacting with coworkers. I am, however, against anything that forces me to interact in a certain way with a group of people I didn’t choose to interact with.

That is just time spent doing a thing that isn’t important to me after we have spent the last couple of years learning how important it is to dedicate time to the important things.

Figure out what is important to your people and they will participate. Waste their time with frivolous nonsense, and they won’t. It’s really that simple.

Linked: 4 Great Ways To Grow Your Career Even When You Work Remote

Linked: 4 Great Ways To Grow Your Career Even When You Work Remote

Ask yourself a simple question, if the best way to grow your own career in a remote environment is to intentionally identify the culture and then deliberately try to use your time to network internally, learn new skills, etc. why would we, as leaders, not do what we can to make that easier? Why put all the burden on a new hire to learn the ropes and find the best people to connect with or the best places to learn when that is information that we have and can share with them?

What intentionality can we include as part of bringing in new people, or connecting the people and knowledge that already exists within the team?

Leaving it up to chance is not the way to go. It was never really the best way to go but in an office, it might have been a little harder to notice. Everything must be intentionally created with remote teams—communication, connection, knowledge-sharing, etc.

Linked: How long your meetings should last
|

Linked: How long your meetings should last

We aren’t strategic about meetings. We don’t plan for the meeting enough, we schedule the meeting in order to plan. We should start planning before the meeting, and figure out what we want from the other folks before we invite them, and tell them. Those of us who think more creatively by ourselves ahead of meeting with others will also bring much more to the meeting when you share the agenda and expectations ahead of time too.

If you take anything away from this, remember that it’s OK to not invite everyone to every meeting, and it’s OK to use all of the other tools we have to collaborate instead of having a meeting.

Your calendar will thank you.

Linked: How to Survive Constant Change at Work
|

Linked: How to Survive Constant Change at Work

The interesting thing to think about is not just in regards to your own managers. This extends out to clients, partners, customers, etc. When they are allowed to constantly shift the goalposts and your response to your employees on the front lines of those relationships is “eh, you know how they are”, consider the fact that you are not keeping them safe. It’s not just an irritation, it’s creating an environment that is not psychologically safe for them. It is doing harm.

This gets old, and as the quote above says, it contributes to a loss of trust and cynicism. It might also lead to a ton of burnout too.

Linked: Employees are twice as likely as executives to work in office full-time
|

Linked: Employees are twice as likely as executives to work in office full-time

This is just wrong on so many levels.

“Executives have often led the charge to return to in-person work — yet new research from Future Forum, Slack’s research consortium, reveals that non-executive employees are nearly twice as likely as executives to be working from the office five days a week.”