Linked: Intentional connection in the digital office
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Linked: Intentional connection in the digital office

The only thing preventing most offices from being fully remote is simply a lack of know-how, or an unwillingness to commit to that change and design the workplace around it. Once you do that, what you’ll find is that rather than hoping for some magic collaboration, you decide who to invite to the table, and ask for their input, on purpose. Intentionally.

Quick Thought – What Does It Say That You Need To Shutdown Your Business for People to get a Break?

Quick Thought – What Does It Say That You Need To Shutdown Your Business for People to get a Break?

If the issue is that people are getting burned out because they are either not taking time off, are continuing to work during their time off to avoid being overwhelmed with work that piled up, or are actually being contacted by their team members during their time off, how about we figure out how to create a culture that allows people to disconnect during their time off, instead of literally just closing up shop for a week? 

Linked: Forget ‘networking’ — just connect with people you find interesting
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Linked: Forget ‘networking’ — just connect with people you find interesting

Justin also has some good advice for how to “be a good hang” online and make friends. I know more than a few people who could use that advice to be a little less awkward online. (i.e. Compliment people’s work, not their appearance, um yes!)

Check it out at the link below, but if I was going to give my own take on that idea, is that for my own social media I usually try and consider what I have to offer the people who choose to follow me. I have this blog, obviously. I can share some other, useful, information, and even a laugh or two mixed in.

For me, most of what I do online goes back to my background in training. I learn something, and I want to share that with others. So I do.

And I try not to be “cringey”. 😉

Linked: Companies hope new benefits will solve your mental health issues. Don’t fall for it.
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Linked: Companies hope new benefits will solve your mental health issues. Don’t fall for it.

It’s cool if your company wants to provide an assistance program or pay for access to an app that will help with meditation, etc. Good for them. But, if the source of your mental health issues is the day-to-day stress of working in an understaffed, toxic, environment, for far less money than you’re worth, and they won’t address that? How much do they really care?

Fixing that is going to require a lot more, as the article below points out. How many organizations are willing to make those kinds of changes?

Just Doing What’s In Front of You
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Just Doing What’s In Front of You

Let’s face it, we all have things that we haven’t had space for in the last couple of years. If you are holding off on using PTO because you can’t make the big travel adventure happen right now, why not use that time to create that space? Personally, we had a couple of weeks in October scheduled for an anniversary trip overseas that has since been canceled. I haven’t canceled the PTO for one simple reason, I still want to use those 2 weeks to create the space, mentally, to do some of the things I’ve been too busy to do, like figure out where I actually want my career to go instead of just doing the work that’s in front of me, or indulge in some of those hobbies that have fallen by the wayside, or maybe even try and catch up with some friends virtually. 

We all need that space, and it keeps getting harder and harder to find it. There’s nothing wrong with doing the work that is in front of us, professionally and personally. Frankly, if you can keep going and getting those things done in this environment, you are to be commended. On the other hand, just doing that prevents us from making changes and doing things differently. It keeps us stuck, and I know far too many people who are stuck right now, waiting for the space to make changes. 

Make that space, any way you can. Give yourself the PTO you deserve. 

Linked: How’d they do it without you?
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Linked: How’d they do it without you?

Seth’s point here is one many workers would do well to remember:

“It’s easy to use our indispensability as fuel. Fuel to speak up and contribute. That’s important. But it’s also possible for that same instinct to backfire, and for us to believe that if we don’t do it, it won’t get done right.

That’s unlikely.”