Linked: Companies hope new benefits will solve your mental health issues. Don’t fall for it.
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Linked: Companies hope new benefits will solve your mental health issues. Don’t fall for it.

It’s cool if your company wants to provide an assistance program or pay for access to an app that will help with meditation, etc. Good for them. But, if the source of your mental health issues is the day-to-day stress of working in an understaffed, toxic, environment, for far less money than you’re worth, and they won’t address that? How much do they really care?

Fixing that is going to require a lot more, as the article below points out. How many organizations are willing to make those kinds of changes?

Just Doing What’s In Front of You
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Just Doing What’s In Front of You

Let’s face it, we all have things that we haven’t had space for in the last couple of years. If you are holding off on using PTO because you can’t make the big travel adventure happen right now, why not use that time to create that space? Personally, we had a couple of weeks in October scheduled for an anniversary trip overseas that has since been canceled. I haven’t canceled the PTO for one simple reason, I still want to use those 2 weeks to create the space, mentally, to do some of the things I’ve been too busy to do, like figure out where I actually want my career to go instead of just doing the work that’s in front of me, or indulge in some of those hobbies that have fallen by the wayside, or maybe even try and catch up with some friends virtually. 

We all need that space, and it keeps getting harder and harder to find it. There’s nothing wrong with doing the work that is in front of us, professionally and personally. Frankly, if you can keep going and getting those things done in this environment, you are to be commended. On the other hand, just doing that prevents us from making changes and doing things differently. It keeps us stuck, and I know far too many people who are stuck right now, waiting for the space to make changes. 

Make that space, any way you can. Give yourself the PTO you deserve. 

Linked: How’d they do it without you?
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Linked: How’d they do it without you?

Seth’s point here is one many workers would do well to remember:

“It’s easy to use our indispensability as fuel. Fuel to speak up and contribute. That’s important. But it’s also possible for that same instinct to backfire, and for us to believe that if we don’t do it, it won’t get done right.

That’s unlikely.”

In Praise of Your Team’s Quiet, Steady Worker – R.I.P. Charlie Watts
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In Praise of Your Team’s Quiet, Steady Worker – R.I.P. Charlie Watts

That’s what Charlie Watts meant to me, the reminder that no matter how much flash you’ve got, someone needs to play the drums and be the steady backbeat that keeps the song going. Without it, you’re just making noise. We’d do well to remember that.

Rest in Peace Charlie.

Linked: Workers Left Behind By the “Great Resignation”
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Linked: Workers Left Behind By the “Great Resignation”

This raises some interesting questions about wealth distribution among many other things. What does happen in service jobs, to the people left behind without other options?

From reading these stories, it’s clear that there is not always an appreciation for people who don’t leave, just an expectation that they will be taking advantage of more by employers, and treated worse by customers.

This makes me consider a couple of things: