Linked: Remote work, innovation, and the Great Resignation
|

Linked: Remote work, innovation, and the Great Resignation

I love this because there are so many companies, SO. MANY. COMPANIES. who think that creative and innovative ideas simply spring to life from people being in the same place, and completely miss that it’s not the proximity, it’s the time.

How many time has someone said to you that they would like to work on an idea with you, and you should book some time on their calendar when you’re both available.

And you look. And maybe in 3-4 months, you can both be available.

Some Employers Have Not Figured Out The Job Market Changed

Some Employers Have Not Figured Out The Job Market Changed

Sadly, I’ve seen and heard many stories like this too. I’ve seen some of those job listings myself. You know the ones, where they want to pay entry-level wages but also require 5 years experience or the list of requirements sound like you’re really looking for multiple people, but only paying for one. In my industry, it’s usually the laundry list of experience and certifications that give it away. Really, you are going to require multiple certifications on half a dozen different platforms and tools, as well as years of recent experience? Who even has access to that many different tools at the same time? 

Also, if you’re hiring process involves multiple interviews and weeks of delays, you’re going to see a lot of your candidates swept up with an offer before you even get through the process.

You need to be better. If you’re not, someone else will be.

Linked: Actions of a good boss turning into a bad boss
|

Linked: Actions of a good boss turning into a bad boss

It’s true. Our words and actions, especially when things are stressful, undermine what we think we are. You may think you’re being a good boss, and maybe most of the time you are, but those days when you’re stressed and short with people or the days you decide to not deal with a problem, become the days that define you in the eyes of the people who report to you.

To them, you aren’t just another person having a bad day. You are the person who controls their success at this company for better or worse, so it’s not just you having a bad day, it’s the organization having a bad day, directed at them.

Linked: Why hybrid work is emotionally exhausting
|

Linked: Why hybrid work is emotionally exhausting

As I said, I was surprised, at first. The more I read however the more clearly I saw a picture emerging, of leaders implementing hybrid as the appearance of flexibility that isn’t really flexibility. How many of the stories shared are of people who are productive at home, but not allowed to simply be productive that way. Or of people who had any decision about how to schedule days in the office in a way that makes sense to them and what they need to do, taken away?

Linked: What If We Just Stopped Being So Available?
|

Linked: What If We Just Stopped Being So Available?

This is really the thing. We all know that our devices are with us all the time, and we all know that everyone else knows. So when the notification pops up, there’s an instantaneous thought process that we all go through.

And no, it’s not is this important or can it wait? The actual thought process is “they know I see this and are probably expecting a response”

However the article below also points out that much of the time, that’s isn’t true. Someone was just reaching out and there is no hurry or even an expectation of immediate response but we don’t know that. So, we either drop everything to reply or we apologize for any delay in replying.

Which makes no sense.

I’ve been involved in direct work with clients in half-day training, or multi-hours long workshops and replied to an email afterwards with an “I’m sorry, I was tied up” opening.

Yes, I’m apologizing for doing my job and paying attention to it.

How dumb is that?