In Praise of Your Team’s Quiet, Steady Worker – R.I.P. Charlie Watts
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In Praise of Your Team’s Quiet, Steady Worker – R.I.P. Charlie Watts

That’s what Charlie Watts meant to me, the reminder that no matter how much flash you’ve got, someone needs to play the drums and be the steady backbeat that keeps the song going. Without it, you’re just making noise. We’d do well to remember that.

Rest in Peace Charlie.

Linked: Workers Left Behind By the “Great Resignation”
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Linked: Workers Left Behind By the “Great Resignation”

This raises some interesting questions about wealth distribution among many other things. What does happen in service jobs, to the people left behind without other options?

From reading these stories, it’s clear that there is not always an appreciation for people who don’t leave, just an expectation that they will be taking advantage of more by employers, and treated worse by customers.

This makes me consider a couple of things:

Why “It’s Just the way Work is” Doesn’t Cut It, Employees Didn’t Create The Busyness Mess
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Why “It’s Just the way Work is” Doesn’t Cut It, Employees Didn’t Create The Busyness Mess

Putting this on individual employees is a cop-out. Saying this isn’t anyone’s fault is a cop-out. This obsession with busyness is a direct result of poor management. There was no mass movement of employees who decided that appearing busy was more important than getting real work done, they simply responded to incentives, and the incentives have favored people who don’t make time to be productive, but are also quick to respond, no matter how unproductive it made them, and until recently, were also the ones sitting at their desks for long hours. People who tried to avoid this, and unplug from work? Yeah right, again, this wasn’t something employees just decided to do on their own. They responded to poor management.

Quick Thought – Meetings that Could Have Been an Email

Quick Thought – Meetings that Could Have Been an Email

Yesterday I attended a meeting that lasted 3 minutes.

At the time I was happy to have not wasted any more time in a meeting than was absolutely necessary and get 27 minutes back of my day.

So, good for us for not wasting time and filling the half-hour time slot.

On the other hand, if ever there was a meeting that could have been an email, this was it.

Are Your Long and Late Hours Actually Making you Less Effective?
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Are Your Long and Late Hours Actually Making you Less Effective?

Look at it this way, if you’re a client of one of these companies, who do you want doing your work, the associate who hasn’t slept more than 4 hours a night in weeks, or someone who’s actually rested? Who is going to do a better job for you? Who is going to be most cognitively effective?

Why do we keep grinding away at the expense of our own cognitive abilities then?