Linked – Women leaders are leaving companies at highest rate ever

Linked – Women leaders are leaving companies at highest rate ever

The disappointing thing is that it’s primarily women walking away from these companies. I think everyone should. If your organization ran successfully with flexible work and a better focus on wellness and mental health initiatives, and now they want to go back to 2019, they are not well-run.

There is no reason to think those organizations will be flexible and nimble enough to navigate the future. Why stay?

Quiet Quitting isn’t New, Caregivers Have Always Had To

Quiet Quitting isn’t New, Caregivers Have Always Had To

Herein lies the problem that many of our younger employees see and refuse to play along with. Why should our choices be between making a comfortable wage and living outside of work? Why do we live in a world where we have to “quit” being engaged in our work or decide against fully engaging in our families and communities? Moms have had to make this choice for years. Be a good mom and care for your children by lessening your career opportunities, or be a bad mom and focus on your career.

Why is that the choice?

I see article after article talking about the “loss” of productivity to companies when employees are not fully engaged. Still, no one ever calculates the loss in our communities from people who contribute nothing outside of their job. We don’t put a number on the damage done when fathers are uninvolved in kids’ lives or on the missed mental health benefits of being involved in hobbies, friendships, and community groups.

Shared Links (weekly) Oct. 9, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) Oct. 9, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) August 14, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) August 14, 2022

Talking Using Metrics to Fight For Your Team’s Wellness on a Rampiva Webcast

Talking Using Metrics to Fight For Your Team’s Wellness on a Rampiva Webcast

It was an interesting conversation, and I hope these conversations can help us in the eDiscovery industry think about employee wellness, mental health, diversity, and other issues that can result from doing things the way we’ve always done them. It’s time for this conversation to be had across the industry. If this can spark more of that, I would be very happy.

Linked: Remote Work Helped Meta Achieve Diversity Goals Years Ahead of Schedule
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Linked: Remote Work Helped Meta Achieve Diversity Goals Years Ahead of Schedule

Something I’ve been thinking a lot about in the industries I have worked in has been this idea that remote and asynchronous work is something that makes it less likely that the only people we can hire are the ones who are both willing and able to dedicate their entire days to be in the office and also willing to jump in and do more work at any hour of the day and weekends. That eliminates a whole bunch of people from even applying, especially women with kids, neurodiverse and disabled candidates, and underrepresented groups without a large presence in the area where your office happens to be. (When you start a company in Silicon Valley, Seattle, Austin, or some other “hot” area, your candidate pool is limited to the people who live there now or are willing to move immediately.)