Why Training Matters for Diversity

Why Training Matters for Diversity

Wouldn’t it be a better choice to locate candidates with some of the skills you’re going to need in a position and know that you have an environment that will help them grow and learn to become exactly what you need to be? Wouldn’t that practice become a way to attract really smart people who want to grow and learn by coming to work for you? Doesn’t that sound like a better option than simply leaving your open jobs unfilled and lamenting the fact that no one wants to work anymore? Unfortunately, there are too many organizations that simply won’t consider this. They aren’t interested in growing the people who work for them, they only want to hire people who can come in with no effort on the organization’s part and do the work starting on day one.

I think they are short-sighted.

Italy’s Employment Minister Touched a Nerve – The Workplace Is Not a Meritocracy

Italy’s Employment Minister Touched a Nerve – The Workplace Is Not a Meritocracy

Mr. Poletti is right, the best thing you can do as a job seeker is be connected to people who can help you. But the Guardian article is also correct that simply leaving it up to that has been, and will be, a guaranteed way to leave too many qualified people behind. Somehow we are going to have to find a middle ground, a place where hiring involves a true meritocracy but allows access to the most diverse group of candidates that we can get. This will not happen by accident. It will only happen person by person and company by company.

Let’s normalize having a wide and diverse professional network.

Linked: More women than men feel uncomfortably cold at the office, and it’s impacting their work performance
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Linked: More women than men feel uncomfortably cold at the office, and it’s impacting their work performance

Look, work from home eliminates this. So it’s clearly a diversity “plus” to let people work at a temperature they control and are most comfortable with, right? “Temperature discomfort is one of the most common sources of complaint within office environments. In particular, research suggests that excessively cold office temperatures are a frequent issue. Notably,…

Shared Links (weekly) Dec. 26 2021

Shared Links (weekly) Dec. 26 2021

Linked: Women in the Workplace
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Linked: Women in the Workplace

This is an acute problem for many of us, who want to participate in doing the work of promoting diversity and inclusion but are still getting measured by everything other than that. And, as the survey points out, it is oftentimes women who take on this work, in an effort to help other women and minorities achieve.

But, as much as the C-Level folks talk about the importance of this work, it is not a part of the job performance, nor is time and effort really allocated for it.

How many of you volunteer to take on this work, running an employee resource group, putting together presentations, leading group discussions, often at the behest of top management, and then when it comes times for performance reviews, the only thing that matters is time spent on bringing in revenue?

The message seems to really be, “It’s great that you want to do this work for us, but make sure you do it on your time because your productivity will be measured against the people who don’t spend any time at all doing this work”

Linked: Why publishers say opening up remote hiring has grown and greatly improved the applicant pool
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Linked: Why publishers say opening up remote hiring has grown and greatly improved the applicant pool

Still, I think it’s clear that opening up the hiring process to people who don’t live in the immediate area creates a more diverse pool of talent to choose from. That we have to go out of our way to tell people that makes me question what companies are doing, or really care about, when they talk about being diverse.