Linked: Pandemic Leaves Firms Scrambling for Cybersecurity Specialists
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Linked: Pandemic Leaves Firms Scrambling for Cybersecurity Specialists

I’m not sure that these companies have done the math. If enough experienced workers in an industry do more than switch between competing offers but step away from the industry into a different career path, there will not be enough experienced workers to go around.

What are you going to do about that? Sit around with unfilled positions and cry about it, or get serious about raising up the next generation of cybersecurity talent?

Linked: The Rise of the 9 p.m. Work Hour
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Linked: The Rise of the 9 p.m. Work Hour

One of the bigger management issues surrounding the remote work model is how and when to communicate. I’m an advocate of more communication, always. I’m a huge advocate of a lot more communication with a remote team.

But, we also have to think about the best way to work together. There are lots, and lots, of meetings that are designed to create better communication but aren’t necessary. Most of them are recurring meetings that no one ever cancels, even when there’s nothing urgent to discuss. Just because we’ve always had this meeting, and we always will.

That’s not a good reason to meet. At the end of the day, if your check-ins or project status meetings are nothing more than a “here’s where we are this week,” we might consider whether it makes more sense for people to send an email instead. Or even a Teams/Slack chat? It’s the same information, but no one has to plan their day around it.

Linked: Cybersecurity Mistakes Are Costing More Jobs Than Ever
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Linked: Cybersecurity Mistakes Are Costing More Jobs Than Ever

On the one hand, I have argued before that we need to hold people accountable because, without a stick, our people will not have as much of a reason to care in the first place. On the other hand, a couple of the stats from the report that Doug pulled out tell me something different:

Linked: New training for staying mentally healthy at work
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Linked: New training for staying mentally healthy at work

It’s from Australia, but the part that I have looked at so far could be useful for everyone trying to figure out how to build and maintain a workplace that supports mental health. (Check your local laws, though, as the legal references are obviously related to Australian workplace safety rules)

Linked: How to build a culture of cybersecurity
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Linked: How to build a culture of cybersecurity

This is the one thing I’ve talked about before when it comes to where we might fall short on our cybersecurity training, we don’t really hold anyone accountable.

Make cybersecurity part of formal employee evaluation. Give people a reason to care. Much like I talked a couple of weeks ago about creating a training culture, provide a way for people to learn more and to learn from others. Give them space and time to talk about security. Recommend they read some security blogs, meet to share stories about the latest phishing information out there, etc.

Linked: The remote work revolution hasn’t happened yet
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Linked: The remote work revolution hasn’t happened yet

What they argue for instead is a decentralization of our work. That rather than being the center of our lives and our time, work is simply a transaction. We give you output, you pay us. That’s it. It’s all there is.

That’s the revolution they are looking for. It might seem like a simple change, but it’s actually quite a different way to look at the world of work. Go read more and listen to the episode. It’s interesting to consider.