Linked: What If We Just Stopped Being So Available?
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Linked: What If We Just Stopped Being So Available?

This is really the thing. We all know that our devices are with us all the time, and we all know that everyone else knows. So when the notification pops up, there’s an instantaneous thought process that we all go through.

And no, it’s not is this important or can it wait? The actual thought process is “they know I see this and are probably expecting a response”

However the article below also points out that much of the time, that’s isn’t true. Someone was just reaching out and there is no hurry or even an expectation of immediate response but we don’t know that. So, we either drop everything to reply or we apologize for any delay in replying.

Which makes no sense.

I’ve been involved in direct work with clients in half-day training, or multi-hours long workshops and replied to an email afterwards with an “I’m sorry, I was tied up” opening.

Yes, I’m apologizing for doing my job and paying attention to it.

How dumb is that?

Linked: Malicious QR Codes – The Digital Slip & Fall
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Linked: Malicious QR Codes – The Digital Slip & Fall

Sarah makes a valid point. Sure, during the COVID pandemic it’s nice that you can go into a restaurant and scan a QR code to view the menu instead of handling physical menus. I worked in a restaurant kitchen in college, I know how nasty some menus can get. On the other hand, are we teaching people to trust something they shouldn’t trust?

Linked: Cities and States Find New Ways to Tax Streaming Services
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Linked: Cities and States Find New Ways to Tax Streaming Services

I reject that argument too, and here is why.

In order to be a customer of Netflix, Disney+, etc. you need broadband internet access, which runs through those wireline facilities. The ISP is already paying for using the right of way and passing that expense on to you. Any service, streaming video, audio, websites you visit, etc. is using the connection that has already been paid for and passed on to you. Taxing each individual service simply creates a situation where there is one connection using the infrastructure, being paid for over and over again and then being passed back to you over and over again.

Linked: Cybersecurity Trends | 25% of Law Firms Have Been Breached
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Linked: Cybersecurity Trends | 25% of Law Firms Have Been Breached

Law firms are an attractive target because of the data, but also because it might be easier to breach a firm than it would be to hack the clients they represent. As the rest of the article goes on to describe, there are still too many firms without cybersecurity training, proper policies, or incident response plans. That is not going to keep things secure.

On top of that, as I’ve written before, the whole culture in firms is a problem. Anytime you have a large group of people in charge, (partners), who are often not to be questioned, social engineering gets a whole lot easier, and the likelihood that even some policy that exists might get ignored is pretty high.