Linked: Forget ‘networking’ — just connect with people you find interesting
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Linked: Forget ‘networking’ — just connect with people you find interesting

Justin also has some good advice for how to “be a good hang” online and make friends. I know more than a few people who could use that advice to be a little less awkward online. (i.e. Compliment people’s work, not their appearance, um yes!)

Check it out at the link below, but if I was going to give my own take on that idea, is that for my own social media I usually try and consider what I have to offer the people who choose to follow me. I have this blog, obviously. I can share some other, useful, information, and even a laugh or two mixed in.

For me, most of what I do online goes back to my background in training. I learn something, and I want to share that with others. So I do.

And I try not to be “cringey”. 😉

Linked: Companies hope new benefits will solve your mental health issues. Don’t fall for it.
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Linked: Companies hope new benefits will solve your mental health issues. Don’t fall for it.

It’s cool if your company wants to provide an assistance program or pay for access to an app that will help with meditation, etc. Good for them. But, if the source of your mental health issues is the day-to-day stress of working in an understaffed, toxic, environment, for far less money than you’re worth, and they won’t address that? How much do they really care?

Fixing that is going to require a lot more, as the article below points out. How many organizations are willing to make those kinds of changes?

Linked: How’d they do it without you?
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Linked: How’d they do it without you?

Seth’s point here is one many workers would do well to remember:

“It’s easy to use our indispensability as fuel. Fuel to speak up and contribute. That’s important. But it’s also possible for that same instinct to backfire, and for us to believe that if we don’t do it, it won’t get done right.

That’s unlikely.”

Linked: Making Work Safe for Mental Illness
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Linked: Making Work Safe for Mental Illness

We’ve been talking about making the workplace “safe” for a number of years now. First, there were the obvious, physical safety issues, and then the focus on sexual harassment, then on to bullying, and diversity. It’s important. You simply don’t get the best results from employees who don’t feel safe.

And yet, in a time when there is an increasing number of employees dealing with mental health issues, we also need to consider what we do to make sure they feel safe as well, for the same reasons. People who don’t feel safe, will not speak up, will not bring their best work to the table, and might just be looking for a safer work environment.

Linked: How GPT-3 and Artificial Intelligence Will Destroy the Internet
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Linked: How GPT-3 and Artificial Intelligence Will Destroy the Internet

This thing is, I think all that noise will end up taking us back somewhere we’ve been before, and maybe shouldn’t have left, when a website with a blog wasn’t “content” but represented the thoughts and opinions of real people, who you could get to know and interact with. After all, the best way to get authentic information is to get it from authentic people, right?