Linked: 5 Simple Ways to Do More for Your Employees’ Mental Health This Week
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Linked: 5 Simple Ways to Do More for Your Employees’ Mental Health This Week

The reason I wanted to focus on this is that it can also be very easy to underestimate how much time people are spending on their work when the work is being done remotely, or in a hybrid situation. Even in the legal or consulting worlds where many of us are billing our time, or at least tracking time worked on projects, it’s not telling you the whole story. There is a lot of time spent on miscellaneous tasks that are getting lost in whatever tool you’re using to track the amount of time worked.

It’s the 15 minutes I logged in to check my schedule before accepting a handful of meeting requests before heading to bed. The time spent clearing out the inbox over my first cup of coffee, or answering questions for a newer coworker, it’s all very likely to not show up in the “official” time because it happens, and then we forget about it.

Do you know how much time your people work without considering it time worth tracking? Do you know how much those little interruptions add to the overall stress levels?

Linked: Bad news: The cybersecurity skills crisis is about to get even worse
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Linked: Bad news: The cybersecurity skills crisis is about to get even worse

Now, the shortage of people leading to overworked stressed, and burned-out workers is the headline, but if you look at the reasons given in the article below, it’s not “just” that. It’s where that situation leads. When you’re short-staffed and constantly putting out fires, you don’t really take the time to think about showing appreciation, helping employees grow their skills and careers, or creating a diverse workplace.

Yet those are the exact things that employees are looking for elsewhere.

Appreciating and growing your employees is not something that is “nice to have” anymore. It’s a requirement.

Linked: Employee Retention Strategies to Future-Proof Your Org
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Linked: Employee Retention Strategies to Future-Proof Your Org

So often, I see people sitting and doing the same job, the same way, year after year. Some people are OK with that, and it becomes difficult to help them grow because they are resistant to change. Most people, however, do not want that to be their career, and so they leave to find a place that allows them to grow. If you aren’t the place that supports their growth, you are at risk of losing them to a place that will. It’s really that simple. 

Linked: Employers Grapple with Surge in Mental Health Issues
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Linked: Employers Grapple with Surge in Mental Health Issues

Having HR professionals understand this is important. Having them try to influence the business leaders might help too. At the end of the day, though, this only gets better if the entire culture buys into it. Any individual manager who isn’t capable of making reasonable accommodations because they haven’t been trained or because the actual business practices create a roadblock for them only proves that this is all just talk.

People who’ve struggled for years to continue working at the risk of their mental health deserve a lot more than talk.

Linked: Most organizations that paid a ransom were hit with a second ransomware attack
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Linked: Most organizations that paid a ransom were hit with a second ransomware attack

Whatever you choose to do, though, the next step needs to be doing everything possible to make sure it doesn’t happen again instead of breathing a sigh of relief that you got your data back and continuing business as usual. That would seem to be the common mistake here.

Don’t make that mistake.

Security pros, where do you fall on the debate on paying or not paying, and does this report change your thinking?