Linked – Mental Health Reminders in the Workplace.

Linked – Mental Health Reminders in the Workplace.

Could you do something for me? The next time you try to schedule a thirty-minute meeting with someone and see a thirty-minute break between long stretches of committed time, leave that time for them. Find a different time, if possible. Or go even further and commit to finding a time not immediately before or after another meeting. Let people have a few minutes. It’s good for all of our mental health. 

Employees Are Using AI Tools To Learn and to Help with Burnout
|

Employees Are Using AI Tools To Learn and to Help with Burnout

If you were burned out, overworked, and struggling to keep up with the demands of the job, and a tool promised to save you 30 minutes or more to get your work done, you’d figure out how to use it, too.

Of course, most of them are trying to use these tools without training and instruction from the company, so this is risky. One, because you have no idea what they are doing and what results they’re getting. Two, they might become even more burned out trying to teach themselves before they get to the part where it helps them save time.

Linked – A Business Case for Building Empathy, Trust, and Psychological Safety
|

Linked – A Business Case for Building Empathy, Trust, and Psychological Safety

What I would like, however, is just once for someone not to feel the need to make a business case for treating your employees with kindness and empathy. This need to include the business case and the impact on the bottom line is an appeal to management in their self-interest and the financial interest of their business.

How about we make the case that being kind, thoughtful, and empathetic towards employees is the right way to treat a fellow human being, regardless of what it means for the bottom line? Is it too much to ask managers and CEOs to treat people like people? Or are we so far down the caste system at work that we have to convince managers to act as if they care about their employees to benefit themselves?

Linked – Mental Health at Work: Managers and Money

Linked – Mental Health at Work: Managers and Money

When management harms the mental health of our employees, we typically respond by offering them yoga or meditation spaces or maybe a lunchtime session on stress management. We never look at the system. We offer them ways to better cope with the broken system, but we never take responsibility for what the workplace is doing to their mental health.

We should be honest about the mental health impacts of layoffs

We should be honest about the mental health impacts of layoffs

Every person you lay off from your business is ten times more likely to try and take their own life.

I don’t think senior executives think in those terms. I suspect many are thinking about juicing the bottom line, getting a little stock price bump, maybe making things more efficient, etc. I think large investors think about what is best for their stock values. That’s why CEOs announce layoffs of 10% of the workforce and are rewarded with $100 million bonuses.

Linked – People in 20s more likely to be out of work because of poor mental health than those in early 40s

Linked – People in 20s more likely to be out of work because of poor mental health than those in early 40s

When you’re young and not on the standard education/career path due to mental health, there’s no career history or learned skills to fall back on. I think many employers would view you as unemployable in our current environment. I’m not saying that should be how it is, but it is likely the way it is. My story illustrates the path out of that, but it also contains some privilege. I was able to go to therapy. My family gave me a place to live while I wasn’t working. I had access to learning tools. I had to work hard to create opportunities to learn new skills, but I also found myself in places where I could do that. I had help.