Linked: How to Be a Mental Health Ally
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Linked: How to Be a Mental Health Ally

It’s that first line that should grab your attention because so many people do not see mental health struggles as something that impacts them, or will impact them. But the numbers don’t lie. Someone you know, probably even someone very close to you, is dealing with mental health struggles as you read this. Someone you work with is doing the same themselves or supporting someone else who is.

How great would it be if we all recognized that and provided a safe place for them to talk about those struggles instead of not welcoming their voices and causing more harm?

I don’t think we can even imagine how helpful that would be because we see it so infrequently. It’s time for that to change.

Linked: It’s Time For Employers To Support Youth Mental Health
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Linked: It’s Time For Employers To Support Youth Mental Health

This is sometimes a missing piece regarding mental health and work. It’s not just the people who work for you, it’s the people who work for you with kids or other family members dealing with mental health issues. “Why do employers need to take a leadership role in addressing this crisis? For starters, young people…

Linked: How Loneliness Is Damaging Our Health

Linked: How Loneliness Is Damaging Our Health

They also point out that whether being lonely causes that change or whether that DNA change makes someone more likely to feel lonely is unclear. What is clear, though, is that helping someone feel less lonely is a worthwhile goal. Helping someone feel like they are part of a community and have something to offer that community helps them. It’s one of the keys to suicide prevention too.

If work gets in the way of this happening, if abusive relationships or stigma get in the way, it can have fatal consequences.

As we consider what the future of our workplaces should be, we’d do well to remember that our people have lives outside of work and are better off when they can enjoy the people in their lives outside of work.

Linked: Mental Health America’s new Mind the Workplace 2022 Report:
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Linked: Mental Health America’s new Mind the Workplace 2022 Report:

Something to check out. Mental Health America’s new Mind the Workplace 2022 Report: An Employer’s Responsibility to Employee Mental Health seeks to answer the latest question on business leaders’ minds: “How can employers meaningfully support employee mental health in 2022?” Data in the report comes from the Work Health Survey, which measured the perceptions of…

Linked: New training for staying mentally healthy at work
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Linked: New training for staying mentally healthy at work

It’s from Australia, but the part that I have looked at so far could be useful for everyone trying to figure out how to build and maintain a workplace that supports mental health. (Check your local laws, though, as the legal references are obviously related to Australian workplace safety rules)

Linked: Nearly half of employees received no wellbeing check-in last year, research reveals
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Linked: Nearly half of employees received no wellbeing check-in last year, research reveals

You cannot claim to care about the people who work for you, and not even check in on their well-being. Those two things do not go together at all. We have to get to that very minimum level before we can do more, and if we can’t even be bothered to get there, I see no reason why anyone with a choice would want to continue working for you.