Linked – Twitter to end free access to its API in Elon Musk’s latest monetization push

Linked – Twitter to end free access to its API in Elon Musk’s latest monetization push

Think about it, services that tell you how many times your post has been shared on Twitter, auto-posting from a blog, automation involving automatic sharing of links, and scheduling of tweets, many of these things involve the API. Many of the tools we all use to share content on Twitter with minimal effort could either be gone or become more expensive next week. That will push a lot of excellent content out of the platform.

Linked – This is the year of the RSS reader. (Really!)
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Linked – This is the year of the RSS reader. (Really!)

I have heard this before, but is the Twitter situation going to be the thing that moves the needle for RSS? I started using Revue to send newsletters last year as an option for people who were trying to follow my websites on social media but ran into the algorithm deciding not to shat them anything that was being posted, especially with Facebook Pages. It had some subscribers but not that many. After Twitter killed Revue, I also moved to Substack and have seen some growth, but I’m also realizing that we can’t replicate Twitter with email newsletters.

Linked – Here’s What Happens To Your Brain And Body If You Work More Than 40 Hours A Week
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Linked – Here’s What Happens To Your Brain And Body If You Work More Than 40 Hours A Week

I’d argue that no job is worth risking your health, but I don’t think Elon would see it that way.

I know he likes to brag about his work hours and how “No one ever changed the world working 40 hours per week”. Reading the science on how more mistake-prone employees working all of those long hours can be makes me wonder if Elon had taken a few hours off and gotten some rest maybe he doesn’t make that offer to buy Twitter and find himself in the mess he’s in.

Would you Pay to use Twitter?

Would you Pay to use Twitter?

Tim leaves out of his analysis accounting for how many users will no longer be there and how that much smaller user base impacts the value proposition. If I’m a journalist using Twitter to interact with readers and attract new readers to my publication, the ROI of paying for a fully-featured Twitter account includes considering how many people it helps me reach. Is it still worth it when my 250,000 followers get cut to 25,000? What about 2,500? What about less?

Before you dismiss that as unlikely, I’d like you to remember that recent Pew research found that “the top 25% of users by tweet volume produce 97% of all tweets, while the bottom 75% of users produce just 3%, according to an analysis conducted over a three-month period in 2021.”

I’m going to just assume that the 75% group who isn’t tweeting very often is not going to pay for Twitter. Of the other 25% we have to consider how many of them will fall into the $12 per year plan because they already don’t follow many people but use Twitter to interact with people who want to follow them. The question is, will those followers still exist? And if they don’t exist, is Twitter still a global conversation? Or is it just another place for privileged people who pay for membership to talk to each other?

Linked – Why It’s Virtually Impossible to Moderate Social Media Sites
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Linked – Why It’s Virtually Impossible to Moderate Social Media Sites

I’m sure at some point, Elon Musk thought for sure that he could buy Twitter and do a better job of content moderation. I’m sure most of us have had a similar thought. We just didn’t have $44 billion lying around.

He did, and now he gets to realize something the rest of us should know by now. There’s no easy way to do it.

Linked: Facebook Cooperated With Law Enforcement in an Abortion Case. Did it Have a Choice?
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Linked: Facebook Cooperated With Law Enforcement in an Abortion Case. Did it Have a Choice?

However, the article below goes on to note that Meta has options. It could create hurdles, it could delay and fight it. Neither of those would likely make much difference in the grand scheme.

Eva Galperin from the EFF, though, offers the best solution. She points out that tech companies can’t turn over what they don’t have.

It’s the collection. It’s the lack of end-to-end encryption. It’s all the information they keep about all of us forever. If they didn’t do that, it wouldn’t exist to be turned over.

They made a choice, and anyone using their services to communicate private information made theirs.