Linked: Crowd-Sourced Suspicion Apps Are Out of Control
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Linked: Crowd-Sourced Suspicion Apps Are Out of Control

I’ve been thinking about this a lot over the last couple of years. We tend to think of the “Big Tech” apps and social networks as being the problem in the digital world, but really it’s all these little places too, because, as they describe, they don’t just keep us informed of actual events in our neighborhoods, they keep us informed of every single instance of something that someone finds suspicious.

This, in turn, makes us go from living in a relatively calm neighborhood to believing we are just one or two days away from the Purge.

Linked: CNN Shutting Down Its Facebook In Australia Shows How Removing 230 Will Silence Speech
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Linked: CNN Shutting Down Its Facebook In Australia Shows How Removing 230 Will Silence Speech

And this same song and dance will repeat for every single site on the internet until there’s very little left. The only companies with enough resources to actually do all the things that would be required to monitor all content, ironically, would be Google, Facebook, etc.

Gee, it’s almost like giving them a gift, eliminating ALL of the competition. It’s no wonder Facebook has been asking for regulation. They know the rest of us won’t be able to keep up.

Apple’s Image Scanning Tool is, Well, Complicated
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Apple’s Image Scanning Tool is, Well, Complicated

At first blush, the idea of scanning images synced up to iCloud for child sexual abuse materials against the hash list of known CSAM images seems like a good idea. As a survivor of childhood sexual abuse myself, I want tech companies to takes some initiative to deal with this issue. They also want to scan images on kids’ phones using AI to see if kids are getting into any trouble with sending or receiving sexual material. Again, that sounds like a good thing. But, as the EFF points out, this all requires a backdoor, and backdoors, once created, almost never remain used for just one purpose.

Linked: Can the ‘right to disconnect’ exist in a remote-work world?
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Linked: Can the ‘right to disconnect’ exist in a remote-work world?

Anything the government comes up with might protect workers from being required to work all the time, but the devil in the detail is how to allow workers to choose which hours they do work within that? It gets a bit messy, doesn’t it, and really isn’t that the issue with the government getting involved? It limits the possibilities by putting a defined “work” time, when what is really needed is the flexibility to figure out the best time, and location, that allows a worker to get what needs to be done, done, and still have a life that is outside of work. That’s going to look different for everyone, so there can’t be rules passed down from an outsider, there will need to be an understanding between workers, and management, on what works best for everyone, including when they will disconnect.

That does, of course, require some more effort and imagination. Are you up to it?

Linked: Why The 2021 ‘Turnover Tsunami’ Is Happening And What Business Leaders Can Do To Prepare
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Linked: Why The 2021 ‘Turnover Tsunami’ Is Happening And What Business Leaders Can Do To Prepare

Sadly, most of the mentions I’ve seen of these issues place the blame squarely outside of the employer. It’s the government’s fault for being too generous with stimulus checks and unemployment benefits, it’s the lockdowns and working from home, it’s the lack of daycare options, etc.

What they all fail to mention, that this article at least starts to recognize, is that there are actually a lot of things employers could do.