Linked: How long your meetings should last
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Linked: How long your meetings should last

We aren’t strategic about meetings. We don’t plan for the meeting enough, we schedule the meeting in order to plan. We should start planning before the meeting, and figure out what we want from the other folks before we invite them, and tell them. Those of us who think more creatively by ourselves ahead of meeting with others will also bring much more to the meeting when you share the agenda and expectations ahead of time too.

If you take anything away from this, remember that it’s OK to not invite everyone to every meeting, and it’s OK to use all of the other tools we have to collaborate instead of having a meeting.

Your calendar will thank you.

Linked: The Rise of the 9 p.m. Work Hour
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Linked: The Rise of the 9 p.m. Work Hour

One of the bigger management issues surrounding the remote work model is how and when to communicate. I’m an advocate of more communication, always. I’m a huge advocate of a lot more communication with a remote team.

But, we also have to think about the best way to work together. There are lots, and lots, of meetings that are designed to create better communication but aren’t necessary. Most of them are recurring meetings that no one ever cancels, even when there’s nothing urgent to discuss. Just because we’ve always had this meeting, and we always will.

That’s not a good reason to meet. At the end of the day, if your check-ins or project status meetings are nothing more than a “here’s where we are this week,” we might consider whether it makes more sense for people to send an email instead. Or even a Teams/Slack chat? It’s the same information, but no one has to plan their day around it.

Linked: Remote work, innovation, and the Great Resignation
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Linked: Remote work, innovation, and the Great Resignation

I love this because there are so many companies, SO. MANY. COMPANIES. who think that creative and innovative ideas simply spring to life from people being in the same place, and completely miss that it’s not the proximity, it’s the time.

How many time has someone said to you that they would like to work on an idea with you, and you should book some time on their calendar when you’re both available.

And you look. And maybe in 3-4 months, you can both be available.

We Should Stop Equating Being Busy With Being Important

We Should Stop Equating Being Busy With Being Important

It grabbed my attention because it’s something I hear quite often, often in combination with the other, more obvious, “complaint” about working long hours.

And yes, the word complaint is in quotes because we all know that when we mention the hours or the back-to-back meetings, we complain about it, but we are really bragging about how busy we are for one simple reason. Busy people are in demand, they are important.

But, are they really?

Linked: 4 video meeting rules that should follow us back to the office
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Linked: 4 video meeting rules that should follow us back to the office

I agree, I have noticed that people do seem to be more aware of when someone else is trying to talk and how they might have interrupted or stepped over them. We absolutely should make time for just socializing. One of my biggest pet peeves about the argument that remote workers just don’t connect as a team and collaborate is that it is possible if you simply intentionally create the space for it. We should trust our employees enough to multitask during the parts of meetings that aren’t really relevant to them, and by all means, we should consider having fewer meetings.