Do Layoffs Fix Anything, or Do We Have Them Because Everyone Else is Doing It?

Do Layoffs Fix Anything, or Do We Have Them Because Everyone Else is Doing It?

Take a hard look at what leaders are saying about layoffs and what they focus on. Do they seem personally hurt and concerned for the people leaving? Do they have honest and transparent explanations for why they made these decisions? Or do they repeat platitudes about “recession,” costs, and other bits of financial jargon to explain away something so painful to the same people they were calling part of the family a week ago?

Families don’t cut the number of kids when money gets tight. Your workplace is not a family and does not deserve a level of commitment that matches your family or your health. Layoffs are sometimes necessary, but mostly just a nice tool to perk up the value of a company for a specific part of the structure or to make up for mistakes made by the same people making these job cuts.

That’s business. I’ve argued for years that business has a vested interest in employee well-being. Caring about your people is how you get their best. I hope leaders will continue to grow in that regard, but as an individual employee, you need to care about yourself more. If your job isn’t meeting your career needs in terms of money, development, or work-life balance, find a better one. You owe them nothing. They pay you to do a job until they decide not to. You owe them that work.

That is all.

It’s All About Flexibility

It’s All About Flexibility

Later it occurred to me that mental health should be handled the same way in the workplace. No two people are the same or have the same mental health issues. What I could accomplish work-wise during the time I was medicated and seeing a therapist might not be the same as someone else in therapy.  One person might need some time away from work during a crisis, while someone else might need work to be the thing that keeps them living with some day-to-day structure. There will not be one solution that fits everyone. In any of these situations, it will be essential to allow employees to find what works for them and their work. Providing some flexibility will go a long way toward keeping an employee engaged instead of making them feel unsupported and looking to go elsewhere. It might also go a long way toward helping them heal as well, to know they have a consistent source of income that is not at risk.

Linked – Skills, Skills, Skills

Linked – Skills, Skills, Skills

I’ve said it before, but let me repeat it. Regarding technology, what you learned in college is probably pointless within 2-3 years. What you did at work 5-10 years ago is useless. Continuous learning and upskilling are not optional. Talking about skills-based hiring is a new trend, but it’s the trend that made sense even before it became popular. Your degrees and resume don’t matter nearly as much as what you can do right now and what you can learn going forward.

This is the business world we live in now. There is no cushy job where you can do the same thing in the same place for 30 years. That’s ancient history, and our career plans and hiring practices must match the current reality.

Shared Links (weekly) Dec. 18 2022

Shared Links (weekly) Dec. 18 2022

Another New Term for People Looking out for Themselves – Career Cushioning

Another New Term for People Looking out for Themselves – Career Cushioning

The quickest way to cut expenses is to cut staff. This is the way of the world in the 21st Century. Until someone comes along and changes that, it only makes sense to keep your options open. As the article I linked points out, that can mean keeping your knowledge and skills up to date, staying in touch with your network, and possibly looking at side gigs you could hop to if you find yourself in a company that is laying off staff.

I don’t see anything wrong with that. It’s not disloyal to your employer. That’s not the world we work in any longer.

Linked – Talent Development—Let’s Get These Myths Out of the Way!

Linked – Talent Development—Let’s Get These Myths Out of the Way!

Imagine having one thing you can do that would give you a 94% retention rate. There is one, though it won’t be as simple as doing one thing. It will involve figuring out the appropriate career development tools and paths for the people you are trying to retain, but having a program designed for that purpose gets you way ahead of most companies.

Yes, the thought that people aren’t loyal and won’t stay no matter what you invest in them is, in fact, a myth.