An Important eDiscovery Lesson From Jon Gruden
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An Important eDiscovery Lesson From Jon Gruden

See Jon, even when the investigation has nothing to do with you, those comments you made in the email exist, and the guy you sent them to didn’t, or couldn’t, delete them. So even though they may have flown under the radar for all these years, all it took was one investigation or lawsuit to involve the other people on the email chain, and everything you said is now out there.

You would think people would stop having to relearn this lesson every few years, but alas here we are.

Linked: CNN Shutting Down Its Facebook In Australia Shows How Removing 230 Will Silence Speech
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Linked: CNN Shutting Down Its Facebook In Australia Shows How Removing 230 Will Silence Speech

And this same song and dance will repeat for every single site on the internet until there’s very little left. The only companies with enough resources to actually do all the things that would be required to monitor all content, ironically, would be Google, Facebook, etc.

Gee, it’s almost like giving them a gift, eliminating ALL of the competition. It’s no wonder Facebook has been asking for regulation. They know the rest of us won’t be able to keep up.

Linked: “I’m totally screwed.” WD My Book Live users wake up to find their data deleted
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Linked: “I’m totally screwed.” WD My Book Live users wake up to find their data deleted

I hope the folks who lost data can somehow get it back. Losing data to a failure of any kind is a pain in the ass. On the other hand, if the ransomware plague has taught us anything, it’s to have backups, online and offline. Because anything connected to the infected device is at risk, but if I have a copy that isn’t connected to anything, it’s safe.

Yes, it’s more work. Yes, it takes time and effort.

So does figuring out how to deal with losing all of your data. 

How Work From Anywhere Could Help Repair a Broken Employer – Employee Relationship

How Work From Anywhere Could Help Repair a Broken Employer – Employee Relationship

So, I left, for a job I could do from anywhere. And, most of all, I appreciate the fact that I can do this job from anywhere, even if the pandemic has meant doing it from the same exact spot in my house for the last 15 months. Because, when the time comes, I can be where I need to be, and continue working. That matters. That shows that the company trusts me, and I want to continue to earn that trust by meeting deadlines and getting my work done.

That kind of relationship, or culture if you will, seems to be missing from many companies based on what I’m seeing other people talk about, online and off. Yet, every company out there like top brag about their top-notch “culture”.

Culture isn’t what you say you do, culture is what you do together. And if, together, you have no trust between employees and management, well that’s your culture, regardless of what your mission statements says.

Culture is Defined by the Worst Behavior Tolerated
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Culture is Defined by the Worst Behavior Tolerated

I wish I could take credit for the line in the title. But, I can’t. It has, however, been rumbling around in my brain for the past couple of days since I heard John Amaechi say it on a recent episode of Adam Grant’s podcast “Worklife” (Go listen to the whole episode, it’s very thought-provoking)

In an episode about how to build an anti-racist workplace, this was the line that sort of stopped not only me, but Adam as well. And, I think it applies to much more than anti-racism.