Linked – Tell Employees What It Takes to Get a Promotion

Linked – Tell Employees What It Takes to Get a Promotion

This headline seems obvious. If you have an employee who has set a goal of being promoted to the next level of your organization, you should be able to tell them what is required. Yet, in many companies, it’s not that easy. There could be several reasons for this, but these are the ones I’ve seen and heard in my years:

Linked – A Business Case for Building Empathy, Trust, and Psychological Safety
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Linked – A Business Case for Building Empathy, Trust, and Psychological Safety

What I would like, however, is just once for someone not to feel the need to make a business case for treating your employees with kindness and empathy. This need to include the business case and the impact on the bottom line is an appeal to management in their self-interest and the financial interest of their business.

How about we make the case that being kind, thoughtful, and empathetic towards employees is the right way to treat a fellow human being, regardless of what it means for the bottom line? Is it too much to ask managers and CEOs to treat people like people? Or are we so far down the caste system at work that we have to convince managers to act as if they care about their employees to benefit themselves?

Linked – Mental Health at Work: Managers and Money

Linked – Mental Health at Work: Managers and Money

When management harms the mental health of our employees, we typically respond by offering them yoga or meditation spaces or maybe a lunchtime session on stress management. We never look at the system. We offer them ways to better cope with the broken system, but we never take responsibility for what the workplace is doing to their mental health.

Linked – How To Communicate Better At Work Easily And Accomplish More

Linked – How To Communicate Better At Work Easily And Accomplish More

Of all the skills that Liz writes about to help us all communicate better, this is the key. If the leaders in your workplace are not communicating, and we see how important listening is to that communication as well, the rest of the team is unlikely to be doing it well either. It’s a modeled behavior. When leaders are open to connection, listen carefully to their reports, and work toward clarity and agreement, that flows down into how the team interacts with each other. When leaders only ever issue directives with no consideration for the humans who report to them, you’ll see that same behavior across the team.