The Stories We Tell Ourselves About Work

posted in: Career, Mental Health 0 |
Reading Time: 6 minutes

Whether you want to talk about social media posts about “always grinding”, the never-ending side-hustle, etc. even in the midst of a global pandemic and the acknowledgement of the mental health issues tied to overwork, we still brag about how much we overwork. In the workplace, we talk a good game about employee wellness, and work-life balance, but who wins all the accolades at the end of each project, or quarter? The folks who put in the “extra effort”. (aka “hours”) 

It’s as if we never really left that early Protestant environment, and it’s the same reason why so many people who have been successful have such a hard time accepting that things have changed. We still hang on to the belief that says good people work hard, and that hard work leads to success. Bad people don’t work hard, and this is why they don’t have success.… Read More

Linked: Workers taking charge by upskilling

posted in: Career, Links 0 |
Reading Time: 2 minutes

The first thing that jumped out at me is that I am very glad to see people taking learning into their own hands instead of waiting for their company to train them. I have always been a big fan of that. Your career, is your career, and you should act that way when it comes to learning new skills.

The second thing I thought was, if 77% of people are ready to learn new skills, as a company, you need to step up and offer opportunities for people to do just that. Very few people are going to be happy sitting and doing the same job for the next 20 years, and rightfully so, since we know that there’s almost no chance the jobs we do now, will still exist in the same way in as little as 5 years.

And, the last thing that jumped out at me? Nearly half are interested in running their own businesses? Are you prepared for that? For half of your employees to maybe become your competitors? It wouldn’t shock me. There’s a lot to be said for the flexibility of working for yourself. Choosing your projects, choosing your location, and your hours. Really, the one thing I keep seeing, over and over again, in interviews with experts and economists, is that health insurance is the one thing standing in the way. If we untied employment and health coverage, there might just be a massive overall in the U.S. labor market.… Read More

As a Straight, White, Male – Why Now is a Great Time to Attend Employee Resource Group Meetings

posted in: Career, Personal 0 |
Reading Time: 4 minutes

Luckily, with everything having remote options now, it’s actually pretty easy to pop in and simply listen without really being noticed, or at least, feeling a bit better about not being noticed.

And, really, you should. Everyone should. Not because you necessarily have anything to add, but because you have an opportunity to listen.

Listening to different groups of people talk about their issues will open your eyes to the things that we, as white men, don’t notice. It gives us the opportunity to hear about racism and sexism that still happens to real people that we know and interact with every day. The stories about things like street harassment aren’t happening to random women complaining online, they are happening to the same women I just spent hours working through a project with, the people who’ve been victims of racist violence aren’t random names in the news, they are the folks we were just chatting about the weather with before a conference call, and collaborating with on documentation for the last week. The things we might read about adding pronouns to an email signature make it sound like a decent thing to do, but hearing someone you work with talk about how life-affirming it is to not be the “one” person at the company doing it? Yeah, it hits different when you hear that from someone you know.

So, as much as I have gone about my professional life glad that there were resource groups available but not really paying much attention to them, I’ve recently made a change and tried to drop in and listen where I could. It’s been a challenge. These are not fun, light, conversations. They shouldn’t be.… Read More

Linked: Why Introverts Can Be the Best Public Speakers

posted in: Links, Training 0 |
Reading Time: 1 minute

It may not be a huge surprise to know that I agree with Neil Gordon on this one:

“It turns out that a public speaker’s most important asset isn’t their theatricality, their story, or how extroverted and boisterous they are.

It’s their capacity to help their audience to believe that change is possible.”… Read More

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