Linked – The Real AI Revolution Will Be Invisible

Linked – The Real AI Revolution Will Be Invisible

That doesn’t mean we won’t make a mess of things getting there. Some employers will go through rounds of layoffs, hoping to replace workers with AI writers, photographers, coders, etc. Plenty of companies will rush to add something they can call “AI” to their products to look innovative, and everyone will stumble along learning what AI might be useful for. 

Then, we’ll end up using the AI built into all the same tools we use now.

Linked – Return to Office, Return to Sexual Harassment?

Linked – Return to Office, Return to Sexual Harassment?

The article offers some suggestions on educating your employees about harassment and what you should be doing with programs, but I want to get brutally honest here. 

What workplace hasn’t already held a sexual harassment seminar? Is it making any difference? Not when you tell me that remote work was the most effective way to lower incidences of harassment. Essentially, keeping people away from each other was the only way we found to significantly dent the overall statistics. 

Want to know what would make a dent? Fire people. On the spot. Publicly. The first time it happens. 

Linked – Time Is A Management Tool, Not A Pricing Tool
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Linked – Time Is A Management Tool, Not A Pricing Tool

It’s been an issue before, but firms have always been able to work around the edges, limiting the impact those efficiencies had on their overall billable hours. This feels different. The entire point of AI tools is to create significant efficiencies across the business world. Not using them will end many client relationships. They won’t accept that level of inefficiency. On the other hand, a firm investing in AI technology does not get a return on investment if their revenue method is hours worked.

Linked – Tell Employees What It Takes to Get a Promotion

Linked – Tell Employees What It Takes to Get a Promotion

This headline seems obvious. If you have an employee who has set a goal of being promoted to the next level of your organization, you should be able to tell them what is required. Yet, in many companies, it’s not that easy. There could be several reasons for this, but these are the ones I’ve seen and heard in my years:

Linked – A Business Case for Building Empathy, Trust, and Psychological Safety
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Linked – A Business Case for Building Empathy, Trust, and Psychological Safety

What I would like, however, is just once for someone not to feel the need to make a business case for treating your employees with kindness and empathy. This need to include the business case and the impact on the bottom line is an appeal to management in their self-interest and the financial interest of their business.

How about we make the case that being kind, thoughtful, and empathetic towards employees is the right way to treat a fellow human being, regardless of what it means for the bottom line? Is it too much to ask managers and CEOs to treat people like people? Or are we so far down the caste system at work that we have to convince managers to act as if they care about their employees to benefit themselves?