Does Remote Work Make It Obvious Who is Getting Work Done?

Does Remote Work Make It Obvious Who is Getting Work Done?

Regarding technology flattening the organization, I would agree with Ed. Where I’m going to disagree is in assuming every workplace has figured that out and taken advantage of it. 

Bad managers are still bad managers, even if they are remote. If the management style at your company is to measure work by, what Ed calls, the “appearance of work”, you’ve probably struggled with remote work. Or, you’ve got everyone in meetings, or at least available online all day, every day. On the other hand, if you’ve switched to remote work and also switched the way you measure your directs, you’ve probably been very successful and might even be willing to accept remote work permanently. It’s all about understanding that what we do with teams when they work in-person doesn’t work with remote teams and adjusting. 

Remote work isn’t compatible with management that measures workers by the hours they spend at their desks or how many people like you. Those measurements kind of go out the window. So it would be best if you had new, better measurements. I’d argue that you need the measurement you should have always been using, but I digress. 

Culture is Defined by the Worst Behavior Tolerated
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Culture is Defined by the Worst Behavior Tolerated

I wish I could take credit for the line in the title. But, I can’t. It has, however, been rumbling around in my brain for the past couple of days since I heard John Amaechi say it on a recent episode of Adam Grant’s podcast “Worklife” (Go listen to the whole episode, it’s very thought-provoking)

In an episode about how to build an anti-racist workplace, this was the line that sort of stopped not only me, but Adam as well. And, I think it applies to much more than anti-racism.

Linked: Dutch MPs in video conference with deep fake imitation of Navalny’s Chief of Staff
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Linked: Dutch MPs in video conference with deep fake imitation of Navalny’s Chief of Staff

As I think about this, it occurs to me that a lot of the things that we think would give away deep fake videos are things that happen all the time in Zoom or Teams calls, right? The video being a little slow, or jerky, or not keeping up fluidly with the movement of people on screen, etc. So it could be harder to tell that the “person” on the call with you isn’t really who you think it is, and then we can begin to wonder who it was, and what information they got from being there, pretending to be someone else.

Are we ready for that?