Linked – Here’s What Happens To Your Brain And Body If You Work More Than 40 Hours A Week
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Linked – Here’s What Happens To Your Brain And Body If You Work More Than 40 Hours A Week

I’d argue that no job is worth risking your health, but I don’t think Elon would see it that way.

I know he likes to brag about his work hours and how “No one ever changed the world working 40 hours per week”. Reading the science on how more mistake-prone employees working all of those long hours can be makes me wonder if Elon had taken a few hours off and gotten some rest maybe he doesn’t make that offer to buy Twitter and find himself in the mess he’s in.

Would you Pay to use Twitter?

Would you Pay to use Twitter?

Tim leaves out of his analysis accounting for how many users will no longer be there and how that much smaller user base impacts the value proposition. If I’m a journalist using Twitter to interact with readers and attract new readers to my publication, the ROI of paying for a fully-featured Twitter account includes considering how many people it helps me reach. Is it still worth it when my 250,000 followers get cut to 25,000? What about 2,500? What about less?

Before you dismiss that as unlikely, I’d like you to remember that recent Pew research found that “the top 25% of users by tweet volume produce 97% of all tweets, while the bottom 75% of users produce just 3%, according to an analysis conducted over a three-month period in 2021.”

I’m going to just assume that the 75% group who isn’t tweeting very often is not going to pay for Twitter. Of the other 25% we have to consider how many of them will fall into the $12 per year plan because they already don’t follow many people but use Twitter to interact with people who want to follow them. The question is, will those followers still exist? And if they don’t exist, is Twitter still a global conversation? Or is it just another place for privileged people who pay for membership to talk to each other?

Linked – Why It’s Virtually Impossible to Moderate Social Media Sites
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Linked – Why It’s Virtually Impossible to Moderate Social Media Sites

I’m sure at some point, Elon Musk thought for sure that he could buy Twitter and do a better job of content moderation. I’m sure most of us have had a similar thought. We just didn’t have $44 billion lying around.

He did, and now he gets to realize something the rest of us should know by now. There’s no easy way to do it.

Linked: What Facebook Is Good For, and Why It Can’t Be Good Anymore
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Linked: What Facebook Is Good For, and Why It Can’t Be Good Anymore

I’ve moved across the country a couple of times now. I’ve lived in 5 different states and have contacts and friends around the country. (And some outside of the US). Facebook, when it allows me to see someone’s new marriage, their kids, or even the sad things they are living with, provides the best way I’ve found to at least keep in touch in some small way with a lot of those folks.

It’s all the other stuff that makes Facebook terrible.

Shared Links (weekly) May 1, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) May 1, 2022

LinkedIn Cringe and Getting More of What You Measure

LinkedIn Cringe and Getting More of What You Measure

It can be very easy to lose sight of this on Social Media but it can also be easy to lose sight of this in the workplace or in our own careers as well. When we reward certain measurements people respond by doing more of that thing. This makes sense if your goal is to simply attract more attention to yourself. For social media maybe that is your goal. If you are representing a brand on social media, yeah that is probably what you want. However, as an individual, I think you have to ask yourself if getting more eyeballs this way causes you to actually undermine your own goals.