Interesting article

posted in: Uncategorized | 0

Found this link over at Scoble’s today:

Blogs: Another Tool in the Security Pro’s Toolkit

This article gets into one of the first things I noticed about blogs, the potential to process more useful information. By that I mean when I first started this blog way back in Oct. 2001, one of the first things I noticed is that if I wrote a post talking about a specific problem I was having with software, hardware, or just finding the right information, someone would leave a comment with suggestions to fix my problem. That was HUGE! I don’t have a peer network in my workplace to bounce ideas off people, so you guys became that for me.

Secondly, reading other blogs about technology pointed me to more useful things than I would ever have time to find on my own. Another huge step in helping me work better.

Lastly, blogging has helped me refine my writing and communication skills, such as they are. I bet you didn’t realize that I currently keep up with 3 blogs, and write a weekly newsletter, did you? Not only is there this blog, the Child Abuse Blog, and the temporary Office Beta Notes, but I also write an internal, company-wide newsletter than consists of tips and pointers to useful websites. I’ve been doing that for 4 years now, so I was “blogging” in a sense, before I even knew what blogging was. 😉

All of those things that I write serve vastly different purposes, and are geared toward different audiences, which helps the writing skills even more, since I have to take into account who I’m writing for. My internal tips most of the time wouldn’t make any sense to someone who didn’t work here, and some of my pointers to tech news wouldn’t interest anyone who does work here. They are, however, both part of educating, whether it be educating our users, or educating our IT staff (me!). It’s all about sharing knowledge…

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