Linked: Succession planning isn’t only about executives

Linked: Succession planning isn’t only about executives

The importance of succession planning isn’t just about how do we replace our top executives, it’s also about how do we keep doing what we do when the person doing it isn’t here?

There are a lot of businesses dealing with employees who have resigned, who also have to figure out how they did what they did and how to train the next person to do it when no one ever wrote it down.

Write it down. Make it easy to find. Keep it updated. Because people leave.

Training, Learning and Development Folks – The Pressure is On

Training, Learning and Development Folks – The Pressure is On

They aren’t wrong. With the talent gaps being what they are in a number of industries right now, organizational leaders are turning to development and training professionals for help. Let’s face it, hiring gets a lot simpler if we have confidence that our culture and our internal resources will help these new folks that we bring in grow and continue to offer more and more value. We don’t need to wait for someone who ticks every single box that we are looking for, we can find the folks who are available now who tick the majority of them, knowing that our environment will make sure they tick the others in time.

Doing that successfully is a massive advantage in the competition for talent. Your investment pays off.

But, it puts the pressure squarely on those of us working in training and development, doesn’t it? We have to make that investment pay off.

Linked: Employee burnout is a warning sign — about your organization
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Linked: Employee burnout is a warning sign — about your organization

If you are seeing more and more people in your organization, or on your team, talking about stress, burnout, or just leaving, the solution is not a Zoom yoga session, or newsletter tips about how employees can better handle stress.

The problem is coming from inside the house, as they say in the movies.

Linked: Three-quarters of employees’ careers impacted by mental health, report finds
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Linked: Three-quarters of employees’ careers impacted by mental health, report finds

I think a little anxiety and anger are appropriate now. Being distracted from your work should actually be a pretty normal reaction to what is going on in the world. Just replace your own national politics for the UK in that survey and can you really say that something hasn’t prevented you from being your best at work during the last couple of years? I’m in the US, I think it’s crazy that there are people going about their work as if nothing is happening, but I also know that is the corporate culture for many of us as well. For the hours you are “at” work, that’s our time. Spend your own time worrying about the world, grieving for lost loved ones, caring for your family, or your own needs, etc.

This is wrong on so many levels. Your people are not hours of labor on a spreadsheet, they are human beings, and human beings should absolutely be affected by what is going on in the world. Expecting them not to be during work hours tells me a lot more about the management team than it does about the workforce.

It surely doesn’t say anything good about the management team either.

Linked: Because Vulnerable People Need Section 230, The Copia Institute Filed This Amicus Brief At The Eleventh Circuit
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Linked: Because Vulnerable People Need Section 230, The Copia Institute Filed This Amicus Brief At The Eleventh Circuit

The reason I added anonymity above is that is the other suggestion I see often about how to “clean up” social media. The theory is that if everyone had to use their real name and prove who they are, they’d behave better.

If you’ve looked at Facebook or even LinkedIn lately, you might look at that suggestion with some skepticism. You’d be right to.

But, more importantly, as they say above, vulnerable people need not only the freedom to speak, but the freedom to do it anonymously.

Linked: The case for turning off your Zoom camera
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Linked: The case for turning off your Zoom camera

Stop considering people who aren’t on camera as less engaged. This is just your bias. Your smartest employees understand the additional stress being on camera causes and take every opportunity to limit that effect for themselves. Keep people who are that self-aware.

Recently, I was doing a training session with some new employees and started off by telling them to turn their cameras off. I am fairly sure it was their favorite meeting of their week.

Think about how easy that was. I was showing them how to use a cloud tool, I wanted them focused on the screen, what I was doing and what I was saying about what I was doing. They were. I didn’t need their cameras to tell me that.