Linked – Sure, You’ve Got an AI Policy, But Is Everyone Following It?
|

Linked – Sure, You’ve Got an AI Policy, But Is Everyone Following It?

You can say that users aren’t allowed to use AI without approval, but as the link above points out, they’re going to anyway. And why wouldn’t they? Most of them are stressed and overworked, and you’re telling them not to use a tool that could cut some of the time spent completing assigned tasks. 

Good luck with that. 

Linked – Law Firms Start Training Summer Associates on Using Generative AI
|

Linked – Law Firms Start Training Summer Associates on Using Generative AI

I’ve been saying this to anyone who will listen to me rant about it. Your IT or Training and Development teams can only go so far when it comes to training for AI. We can do some training around prompting, show them where to click to enter a prompt, and even show them how to integrate the AI responses into their work. 

What we can’t do is help them judge the results and iterate their prompts based on the results. That requires expertise in your practice area. That can only come from other lawyers. It’s also the much larger learning curve for working with AI. 

Linked – Time Is A Management Tool, Not A Pricing Tool
|

Linked – Time Is A Management Tool, Not A Pricing Tool

It’s been an issue before, but firms have always been able to work around the edges, limiting the impact those efficiencies had on their overall billable hours. This feels different. The entire point of AI tools is to create significant efficiencies across the business world. Not using them will end many client relationships. They won’t accept that level of inefficiency. On the other hand, a firm investing in AI technology does not get a return on investment if their revenue method is hours worked.