Quick Thought – Meeting Free Days Also Say Something About Your Workplace Culture

Quick Thought – Meeting Free Days Also Say Something About Your Workplace Culture

Yes, I am on record as saying that the most important thing in a remote workplace is communication, in fact, I’m a fan of over-communicating. That doesn’t have to mean more meetings though. It can, honestly, just mean making use of all of the communication tools we have, especially when the discussion does not need to be had in real-time. 

If you make Monday “meeting-free” but cram five days’ worth of meetings into the other four days of the week, you’re not helping the situation. You’re just rearranging deck chairs. The real change comes in figuring out how to make do with less meeting time, by taking advantage of alternatives when that makes sense, and by learning how to have more efficient meetings. (Start by not scheduling every meeting for 1 hour, for example. A 10-minute conversation can be a 10-minute meeting. There is no law that says all meetings must be divisible into 30-minute increments just because your Outlook calendar defaults to that.)

Linked: Intentional connection in the digital office
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Linked: Intentional connection in the digital office

The only thing preventing most offices from being fully remote is simply a lack of know-how, or an unwillingness to commit to that change and design the workplace around it. Once you do that, what you’ll find is that rather than hoping for some magic collaboration, you decide who to invite to the table, and ask for their input, on purpose. Intentionally.

Shared Links (weekly) Sept. 19, 2021

Shared Links (weekly) Sept. 19, 2021

Quick Thought – What Does It Say That You Need To Shutdown Your Business for People to get a Break?

Quick Thought – What Does It Say That You Need To Shutdown Your Business for People to get a Break?

If the issue is that people are getting burned out because they are either not taking time off, are continuing to work during their time off to avoid being overwhelmed with work that piled up, or are actually being contacted by their team members during their time off, how about we figure out how to create a culture that allows people to disconnect during their time off, instead of literally just closing up shop for a week? 

Linked: The shortage of tech workers is about to become an even bigger problem for everyone
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Linked: The shortage of tech workers is about to become an even bigger problem for everyone

The shift in tech skills is one of the contributing factors, but it’s not that technology has been changing, because that ALWAYS happens. It’s the insistence that employers can find people with a skill that didn’t even exist 2-3 years ago instead of actually developing the people they already have, or hiring people who can continue to adjust and learn these skills.

How many jobs are going unfilled because you’re looking for someone with expertise in a technology that has only been around for the last 1-2 years? How do you expect there to be a bunch of experts on this technology? How do you expect recent graduates to be familiar with the technology that their college curriculum hasn’t even caught up to yet?

It’s not possible. So you might want to start adjusting your hiring, recruitment, and staff development processes, because that’s how you shrink the talent gap, by creating the talent yourself.

Linked: Forget ‘networking’ — just connect with people you find interesting
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Linked: Forget ‘networking’ — just connect with people you find interesting

Justin also has some good advice for how to “be a good hang” online and make friends. I know more than a few people who could use that advice to be a little less awkward online. (i.e. Compliment people’s work, not their appearance, um yes!)

Check it out at the link below, but if I was going to give my own take on that idea, is that for my own social media I usually try and consider what I have to offer the people who choose to follow me. I have this blog, obviously. I can share some other, useful, information, and even a laugh or two mixed in.

For me, most of what I do online goes back to my background in training. I learn something, and I want to share that with others. So I do.

And I try not to be “cringey”. 😉